Army Corps Final Draft Plan Presentation

Cover image of draft plan presentation  from US Army Corps of Engineers

Cover image of draft plan presentation from US Army Corps of Engineers

Follow up from last Thursday’s presentation in Long Beach.
I couldn’t make it and I am to take it no one else did? Please let us know if you did and if there is any information we need to know.

The City of Long Beach posted today the US Army Corps of Engineers final plan presentation for the barrier island project from Jones Inlet to East Rockaway Inlet, Long Beach Barrier Island. That’s us.

Find the presentation here: US Army Corps of Engineers Atlantic Coast of Long Island, Jones Inlet to East Rockaway Inlet…

Jones Inlet Dredging to Begin

our current look, with as much top sand and forward sand catchment has been moved away from the shoreline to prevent washing away

our current look, with as much top sand and forward sand catchment has been moved away from the shoreline to prevent washing away

There’s been some discussions about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) plan, the fortification along Jones Inlet being held up by NY Dept of Environmental Conservation, movements of sand and the like here in town at the NY Rising and other local meetings.

So I decided to find out what the story is. I sat down with town of Hempstead Department of Conservation and Waterways Commissioner Ron Masters who gave me many, many details.

Due to Sandy and other factors Jones Inlet has become dangerous for maritime navigation and is being dredged starting this month by the Army Corps of Engineers.

This is completely separate and in addition to the upcoming USACE project that will fortify our shores from Atlantic Beach to Jones Inlet, due to begin in 2014.

The bad news is: this plan does not address revetment of the north side of the inlet in Point Lookout: that is still not permitted from NY State Dept of Environmental Conservation.

Now the good news: In this original inlet dredging plan, USACE was to take all of the dredged sand and dump it out to sea. Luckily our town officials, including Commissioner Masters and his staff were able to insert their requests into the process that will actually both save the Army Corps effort and give us that sand that will be dredged, we so desperately need.

Our beach replenishment several years ago was approximately 500,000 cubic yards of sand. The expected dredging in Jones Inlet this time around is expected to be 600,000 cubic yards. 300,000 of that is from the extended Jones Beach side jetty which was damaged badly in Sandy, spilling all that sand over and into the inlet. If you think it looks like there’s a beach along the Jones Beach side of the inlet it is because… there is.

The "beach" on the east side of Jones Inlet, seen from Point Lookout Civic Beach.

The “beach” on the east side of Jones Inlet, seen from Point Lookout Civic Beach.

Commissioner Masters explains, the sand is going “to all 3 Point Lookout beaches between groins 1, 2, and 3” and extra will be left “north of groin 1,” for future discretionary use.

“The Town made the case that the dunes be redone” with that sand he said.

Unfortunately the Army Corps of Engineers had initially said that we could not have it to make “dunes”.

To overcome those objections, Town officials were able to get the sand on the basis that we will, instead, make “wind rows”. The town will make three big, long rows of sand parallel to the shorelines between groins 1-3, from the recovered sand. If they become dunes over time, all the better. The town is trying to place this sand as far back from the tideline as possible.

Mr Masters explains, “The three wind rows add mass to protect us against storms. The big buildup (20′ tall dune at the Point Lookout town beach which was half washed away during Sandy) kept Point Lookout from being flanked” by ocean flooding. Parkside Drive at the beach is in a perilous situation for very big storms and this will provide the best defense for now.

These wind rows will also give extra fortification and depth to our protection system when the big Army Corps plan comes in and expands the beach. That plan also builds new dunes and 3-4 groins (jetties) at the Point Lookout town beach to our west, and westward at Malibu etc.

That’s not all we may get.

Commissioner Masters tells me the town met with the Army Corps of Engineers last week about the USACE renovations of the stone for both the Jones Inlet and East Rockaway Inlet jetties.

Once again, thanks to their proactive measures, the town will get any unused boulders from that project. The USACE has agreed to make them available, and the Town of Hempstead gets invaluable materials for the price of picking them up.

The Inlet dredging project is expected to last about three months. I asked if there would be midwinter dune grass planting and although there are orders for grass in the works it’s unknown yet whether we can actually get the grass or plant it, at that time. I’ll keep you posted.

Coincidentally, while writing this post, I was contacted by Carol Eckert from Water Park Beach Association in Northport, NY.
They’re looking for replenishment beach grass and are having a tough time finding it. Can anyone help her? Post in comments below or email that info to me at makingmypointny@gmail.com and I will forward that info to her.

In related news: Newsday discussed Long Beach receiving $12 million for limited bay side sea walls to protect infrastructure.   

Get Moving! Chuck Schumer Returns to Point Lookout

Johanna Dullahan shakes hands with Senator Chuck Schumer as more Point Lookout Ambassadors observe (l-r)  Erin Brown in turquoise, Sarah Magan in navy, and Stella Curtin in white and blue coat

Johanna Dullahan greets Senator Chuck Schumer as more Point Lookout Ambassadors welcome him, with a few signs of appreciation (l-r) Erin Brown in turquoise, Sarah Magan in navy, and Stella Curtin in white and blue coat

Full funding, $150 million, in place as part of Sandy Aid Bill to pay for Long Beach Barrier Island Storm Damage Reduction Project

“coming back bigger, better, stronger than ever “

Sunday March 24, 2013, Point Lookout Civic Beach- Dozens of politicians and civic leaders descended on Civic Beach to rally around the coming together of the 4 towns in the now fully funded Long Beach Barrier Island Storm Damage Reduction Project, in front of dozens of residents of Point Lookout, Lido Beach, Long Beach and Atlantic Beach.

Senator Schumer and Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray at Point Lookout Civic Beach

Senator Schumer and Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray at Point Lookout Civic Beach

“Today the dream of being safe from storm damage is much closer to reality, and that’s something we can all cheer”, said Town of Hempstead Supervisor Kate Murray. “We are united as a barrier island”.

Kate Murray, flanked by Point Lookout Ambassadors (l-r) Megan Cox, Erin Brown, Sarah Magan (in navy) Lauren Cox (in charcoal Gray) Stella Curtin (rear in white coat) and Johanna Dullahan (in hot pink coat). Thank You Ladies!

Kate Murray, flanked by Point Lookout Ambassadors (l-r) Megan Cox, Erin Brown, Sarah Magan (in navy) Lauren Cox (in charcoal Gray) Stella Curtin (rear in white coat) and Johanna Dullahan (in hot pink coat). Well Done- Thank You Ladies!

Senator Chuck Schumer spoke: “After a decade of planning, multiple storms and destruction, we have finally secured $150 million to give Long Beach the protection it needs”.

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The senator said that there’s three steps to be done now.

"Thats something we can all applaud"- Kate Murray

“Thats something we can all cheer”- Kate Murray

The first is the engineering and design study, which must be coordinated with the building of the Long Beach Boardwalk. This could take 3 to 4 months.

Then that has to go out to bid to hire the contractors. This will take several months as well, and they want to start as soon as the study is done.

Then to start the work, which will take months as well.

Kelly Curtin, bringing back(?) the monorail.(?)

Kelly Curtin, bringing back(?) the monorail.(?)

“We want it shovel ready, in the ground by 2014. That means they’ll start working on it… and get much of it done by next summer season” (summer of -2014).

all around the picture are representatives from Nassau County,  NY State and most of the Long Beach City Council and City Manager.

all around the picture are representatives from Nassau County, NY State and most of the Long Beach City Council and City Manager.

Chuck Schumer also had praise for others, especially our former congressman, Peter King: “it’s easy to call out members of the other party; it’s harder to call out members of your own party when they’re not stepping up to the plate and he did, so and we give him a lot of credit for that.”

Fire Chief Chas Thompson speaks with Mrs Ellen Weisenberg while her husband Harvey Chats with Chuck Schumer

Fire Chief Chas Thompson speaks with Mrs Ellen Weisenberg while her husband Harvey Chats with Chuck Schumer

Now Chuck Schumer has a message for the Army Corps of Engineers and everyone else involved:

“Get moving. You got the money, got the authorization, get the plans … and we don’t want any bureaucrats’ delay”.

Our project is part and parcel of a complete coastal project now to be taken underway all the way from Staten Island, to the Rockaways, Our Long Beach Barrier Island, and then the FIMP-Fire Island to Montauk Point.

“My pledge to you is I will be on them. I will make sure there aren’t delays. We don’t want anything to get in the way. You can feel assured that the kind of protection that is needed in this new world, with all kinds of new storms, will be there.”

Harvey Weisenberg thanked our hero from Washington.

Harvey Weisenberg thanked our hero from Washington.

State Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg said “we had devastation and we’re not going to let it happen again. We have a hero in Washington. He’s been there to meet the needs of our people: God bless and thank you, Chuck.”

“We waited 20 years. The (current) City Council had the courage to move ahead, and now we are going to have the progress we deserve” Harvey Weisenberg said of Long Beach voting unanimously to move forward on this plan.

Long Beach Barrier Island, "coming back bigger, better, stronger than ever"

Long Beach Barrier Island, “coming back bigger, better, stronger than ever”-Chuck Schumer

Long Beach City Council President Scott Mandel spoke and said Long Beach is moving aggressively on the plan.  “Not only do we have the wherewithal to get back and running, now we have the finances to do it as well.”

Long Beach City Council President Scott Mandel Thanks Chuck Schumer for his help. Long Beach is On Board for the Long Beach Barrier Island Storm Damage Reduction Project.

Long Beach City Council President Scott Mandel Thanks Chuck Schumer for his help. Long Beach is On Board for the Long Beach Barrier Island Storm Damage Reduction Project.

Nassau County Legislator Denise Ford said “Let’s get this project going.  Next year we’re going to have a different, better beach and we’re going to have better protection.”

Lido Dunes Civic Association President Liz Murdy speaks.

Lido Dunes Civic Association President Liz Murdy speaks.

Liz Murdy from Lido Dunes Civic Association had praise for the Senator. “Without his perseverance we would not have gotten the funding and we really appreciate it”.   She also thanked Town of Hempstead Supervisor Kate Murray and Department of Conservation and Waterways Commissioner Ron Masters for the work he and his department have done all these years, protecting and strengthening our beaches and our dunes, virtually without any outside help. 

Paul Curtin makes HIS point, and hopefully we'll all have dunes by summer 2014!

Paul Curtin makes HIS point, and hopefully we’ll all have dunes by summer 2014!

Regarding the final product of the project, Senator Schumer said:

“It will be strong; it will be tested; it will be Sandy-proof. If anyone is having doubts whether they should invest in their small business or in a home here on the Long Beach barrier island they should go forward.

We’re coming back bigger, better, stronger than ever.”

Long Beach City Council Votes on Army Corps Plan

what's left of the Long Beach, NY boardwalk at Lincoln Blvd

Taken right afdter Sandy, what’s left of the Long Beach, NY boardwalk at Lincoln Blvd- youre not supposed to be able to see the boats out there! The New Dunes will reach up to about 1 foot below the level of the boardwalk

The Long Beach City Council did vote on the Army Corps of Engineers Plan to Repair and Restore the Long Beach Barrier Island’s beaches, dunes and jetties(groins).

Yes, Unanimous Vote to proceed with the 150 milion dollar plan, which Senator Chuck Schumer has assured will be fully funded.

Thank you to the Long Beach City Council for taking this step forward!   

Maybe we can all start working together again, realizing we are all integrally interrelated when it comes to protecting ourselves, our houses, businesses and infrastructure.   So many of us work together and support eachother outside the political sphere, its great that this previously devisive issue has been put to rest.  

You can read about it here: Newsday: $150M Long Beach plan takes step forward

 

 

Town of Hempstead (Officially) Authorizes Army Corps Plan

TOHNot to be outdone by Long Beach, The Town of Hempstead has beat them to the punch and become the first municipality to officially Authorize the Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project.

from the Town of Hempstead:

Hempstead Town Leads the Way on Long Beach Island Storm Protection Project, First Muncipality to Authorize Plan

Reaffirming its longstanding support for a major coastal protection measure for residents who live on the Long Beach Barrier Island, Hempstead Town today became the first local municipality to authorize the Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project. The project, which will build up local shoreline dunes and erect a system of groins to protect homes on the Long Beach Barrier Island from major storm damage, will be overseen by New York State and the federal government. In order for the project to commence, local municipalities including the Town of Hempstead, Long Beach and Nassau County must “sign-off” on the project.

“Hempstead Town has been unwavering in its support of the storm damage protection plan for well over a decade,” stated Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray. “It’s gratifying that we continue to lead the way as the first locality to ‘sign-off’ on the project, and we encourage other governments to follow our pro-active agenda to protect area homes, businesses and people from flooding and other storm damage.”

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Supervisor Murray and Councilwoman Angie Cullin called upon the federal government to finalize a required project report and complete needed “plans and specs” in order to make the project “shovel ready”. The officials’ plea for action on December 11th was followed-up by a January 27th Point Lookout joint rally with Murray and U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, demanding Congress’ approval of Sandy emergency recovery funding, including full-financing for the Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project. Indeed, the Senator announced on March 12th that all costs associated with the storm damage reduction project would be picked-up by the federal government.

“Hempstead Town will continue to push forward in full support of the Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project,” said Murray. “Councilwoman Cullin and I thank Senator Schumer for securing the needed funding for it to proceed.”

In the aftermath of the Superstorm, Hempstead Town began dredging sand from the ebb shoal of Jones Inlet, and pumping it onto storm-ravaged beaches in Point Lookout. Only weeks after the storm, the town’s Conservation and Waterways team began repairing breaches in the townships’ dune structure, the last line of defense against surging Atlantic seawater.

This most recent work continues Hempstead Town’s long-standing commitment to protecting local homes and businesses. Over the course of several decades, the town built dunes, erected snow fencing, planted beach grass and built stone revetments (bulkheads) – all in an effort to protect against storm damage and combat coastal erosion. A December 12, 2012 New York Times article observed that Hempstead Town hamlets of Point Lookout, Lido Beach and East Atlantic Beach weathered Sandy’s wrath better than Long Beach because of Hempstead Town’s pro-active dune building program. Hempstead Town bolstered its beach protection project after the City of Long Beach declined to “opt-in” to the Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project many years ago.

“We are dedicated to protecting our neighbors on the barrier island,” said Cullin. “This project will enhance the town’s storm protection efforts.”

“The Long Beach Island Storm Damage Reduction Project is essential to the protection of residents who call the barrier island home,” concluded Murray. “We’re proud to be the first local government to authorize the project, and encourage other localities to follow our lead.”

Long Beach City Council finally to Revisit Army Corps of Engineers Plan

Len Torres says the majority is for the Army Corps Plan.

Video capture where Len Torres says the majority on the Long Beach City Council is for the Army Corps of Engineers Plan.

The Long Beach City Council are to finally put Army Corps of Engineers Plan on their docket at this week’s City Council Meeting.

I Hope they fulfill the promises they made when Senator Schumer was in town to finally approve it. (I have the video!)
I was about to blow a gasket when it wasn’t on their docket again (after almost 2 months)  for this weeks council meeting, but obviously some kind of pressure was applied and it has been added late yesterday.  Carolyn McCarthy finally came down to Long Beach to see the damage yesterday.   Coincidence?? 

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The problem is, without Long Beach’s approval, and soon, we may have to get in line behind all the other areas damaged by Sandy. 

Because this project is “shovel ready”- meaning it can go right into the final stages and construction, we can be first in line.  Any delay in approving it, and we can end up YEARS behind by having to get in line at that time, instead.

It doesnt make sense to rebuild houses, businesses, the boardwalk (itself alone now up to costing about $1000 for each and every person residing in Long Beach!) etc and then leave it unprotected from the Ocean in big storms for the forseeable future?

At last week’s Point Lookout Civic Association meeting, Long Beach resident, Sandy victim, and Nassau County Legislator Denise Ford described the damage done to Long Beach because they did not have a dune system. The South (Beach) sides of Point Lookout, Lido Beach and Atlantic Beach had nowhere near the damage because the DUNES protected them.   Those dunes are for the most part heavily damaged now, but they did their job-they protected us.  She said not nearly as much flooding happened on the beach side in Atlantic Beach, where similar houses a block or two away in the West End of Long Beach had 6 feet of Water and sand(that wasnt held together like a dune) washed into the houses.

I guess tonight we’ll see what the council wants to do.  

 

Find out more by clicking the links below from
Sea By The City

and

Long Beach Patch